Meet the Candidates 2013

Candidates for the ACUA Board

The ACUA is composed of twelve men and women elected on a rotating basis for four-year terms by the membership of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The board includes professionals from state and federal archaeology programs, museums, non-profit institutes, private industry CRM firms, and avocational societies involved in underwater archaeology. It also includes professionals in the fields of conservation and education.

Each year the board strives to include candidates that represent diverse interests and global perspectives. The six colleagues who have graciously agreed to stand for election for the three positions spanning the 2013-2016 term are:

Lynn Harris: Assistant Professor, Program in Maritime Studies, East Carolina University

Connie Kelleher: State Underwater Archaeologist, Underwater Archaeology Unit, Department of Arts,  Heritage  and the Gaeltacht

Sorna Khakzad: Intern, UNESCO Headquarter, Paris, France and Researcher, Flemish Heritage Institute, Brussels, Belgium, Research on underwater and coastal cultural heritage policy making

Massimiliano Secci: Research Fellow at Dipartimento di Storia, Scienze dell’Uomo e della Formazione – Università degli Studi di Sassari

James Spirek: State Underwater Archaeologist, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina Columbia

Wendy van Duivenvoorde: Lecturer in Maritime Archaeology at Flinders University

 


Harris ACUA 2Lynn Harris

Education
Ph.D.,  Colonial Period (American) History, African History, Anthropology and Historic Preservation, University of South Carolina
M.A., Maritime History and Underwater Archaeology, East Carolina University
B.A., African History, Archaeology and Anthropology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Present Position
Assistant Professor, Program in Maritime Studies, East Carolina University

Past Positions
Underwater Archaeologist, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina
Underwater Archaeologist, National Monuments Council, South Africa  (international consultancy, Assistant Field Archaeologist and Curator, South African Museum

Professional Service to SHA and other Societies
Advisor, Sea Patrol Action Committee, South Africa
Advisor, Science Committee of the National Monuments Council, South Africa
Underwater Archaeology Public Education Instructor for South Africa and USA (Nautical Archaeology Society
Editorial Board, Newsletter of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology
Adjunct Professor at the College of Charleston, the Citadel Military College and Trident Technical College, South Carolina

Research Interests
Maritime History and Archaeology in Africa, Caribbean, and American South East and Great Lakes; Development of Public, Undergraduate and Graduate Courses and Curriculum in Underwater Archaeology; Heritage Tourism; Riverine Archaeology; Colonial History;  Shipyards and Labor History

Recent Publications
South Carolina’s  Underwater Archaeology Public Education Program and International Outreach Initiatives. Part I. South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology,  Research Manuscript Series   No. 218. (1996); Survey of Submerged Cultural Resources in the Ashley River, Dorchester County, South Carolina, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, Stephenson Award Publication Series (1996); Submerged Small Craft Documentation in South Carolina, Museum Small Craft Association Transactions, Volume 3:46-53 (1997); Underwater Heritage and the Diving Community in Barbara J. Little, Public Benefits of Archaeology. Chapter 6:59-73, University Press of Florida, Gainsville (2002); James Spirek and Lynn Harris, Maritime Heritage on Display: Underwater Examples from South Carolina in James D. Spirek and Della A. Scott-Ireton, Submerged Cultural Resource Management: Preserving and Interpreting our Maritime Heritage. Chapter 13:165-175. Plenum Publishers, New York (2003);  South Carolina Shipyards: Labour, Logistics, Lumber and Ladies, Journal of Maritime Archaeology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 17-35 (2010); The Plantation boat Accomodation: An Icon of the South. Nautical Research Journal, 56 (2), 93-114, co-authored with Dan Brown and Kate Cooper (2010);  Monuments in the Desert: A Maritime Landscape in Namibia, Journal of Maritime Archaeology 1:11-140, co-authored with Kate Schnitzer and Jennifer Jones (2012); “Patroons and Periguas: Enslaved Watermen and Watercraft of the Low Country,” Book Manuscript in Press with University of South Carolina, anticipated publication date 2014.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?

I have the benefit of a variety of professional working experiences as an underwater and terrestrial archaeologist, a museum curator, cultural resource manager, sport diver/public educator and an assistant professor in a graduate program in Maritime Studies.  This will be of value in understanding the complex issues that confront the diverse professional membership of CUA/SHA. A scholarly background in southern African maritime archaeology and continued work in this area provides an international contribution and perspective. My experiences developing local, regional and international partnership projects and programs is another asset for a growing organization where strategic collaboration between agencies is often the key to success. Affiliation with one of the few underwater archaeology graduate programs in the USA keeps me in touch with current scholarship and trends in theoretical and methodological approaches, in addition to the rapidly growing student population venturing into the professional workforce.

 If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I would emphasize the two important ACU/SHA agendas: Firstly, continuing to act as advocates for cultural heritage through the education of government agencies and scholars from diverse backgrounds, but also of various public communities engaged in underwater, foreshore or beach archaeology either through structured training programs or local outreach initiatives.  I continue to think that SHA is an appropriate and effective platform to address connections between the direction of graduate student education and the changing nature of the global job market.  Secondly, I would like to promote active participation of graduate students in SHA, such as the Student Sub-Committee Forum, and by encouraging and facilitating presentations by the graduate students membership in a conference setting as an entry to the professional arena.


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAConnie Kelleher

Education

Ph.D. Seventeenth-century piracy in Ireland: historical archaeology, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
M.A. Maritime archaeology, University College, Cork, Ireland
B.A. Shipwrecks and Archaeology, University College, Cork, Ireland

Present Position
State Underwater Archaeologist, Underwater Archaeology Unit, Department of Arts,  Heritage  and the Gaeltacht
Lecturer in Underwater Archaeology, National University of Ireland, University College Cork

 Professional Service to SHA and other Societies
B
oard member of the Advisory Council on Underwater Archaeology since 2010; Committee member of the Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group (IPMAG); Past Council member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries in Ireland (RSAI); Co-organiser of Maritime and Underwater Archaeology Theme and Sessions, Sixth World Archaeology Congress (WAC) 2008, Dublin; Ireland representative, UNESCO working group on underwater archaeology meeting, London 2008

Research Interests
Piracy in the early seventeenth-century Atlantic world, particularly looking at piracy as part of the process of state building; colonial archaeology, especially with regard to Ireland and the expansion of maritime empires; the archaeology of prostitution in the seventeenth-century; post-medieval shipwreck archaeology; maritime landscapes; managing the UCH.

Recent Publications
Depicting a Pirate Landscape: the anti-pirate chart of 1612 and archaeological footprints on the ground, Journal of Irish Archaeology, 23, (forthcoming 2014); Ireland’s Golden Age of Piracy: History, Cartography and Emerging Archaeology, in C. Ewen & R. Skowronek (eds.), X-Marks the Spot: The Archaeology of Piracy, Vol. II (forthcoming 2013-2014); Pirate Ports and Harbours of Southwest Ireland: Historical Archaeology: Special Edition, Adam C. Rogers (ed.), Journal of Maritime Archaeology, (forthcoming, 2013);  Santa Ana Maria: 1628 wreck of the Capitana of La Flota de la Nueva España, 2012. In J. C., Henderson (ed.), Beyond Boundaries: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Underwater Archaeology IKUWA 3, London 2008, Römisch-Germanische Kommission; Shipwrecks of the Modern Historic Period, c. 1580-1914, with Fionnbarr Moore & Karl Brady, 2012; In K. Brady, C. McKeon, J. Lyttleton, I. Lawlor (eds.), Warships, U-Boats and Liners: A Guide to Shipwrecks Mapped in Irish Waters, Government of Ireland Publications; The Rutland Island Wreck, 2012. In K. Brady, C. McKeon, J. Lyttleton, I. Lawlor (eds.), Warships, U-Boats and Liners: A Guide to Shipwrecks Mapped in Irish Waters, Government of Ireland Publications; Ireland’s Treasure Hunting Past: The Case for Underwater Archaeology, 2011. F. Castro & L. Thomas (eds.), ACUA Underwater Archaeology Proceedings 2011; La Trinidad Valencera, 1588 Spanish Armada Wreck: results of the Underwater Archaeology Unit’s work at the site, 2004-2006, 2011. Journal of Irish Archaeology, 20; The Dunworley Bay Shipwreck: 17th-century evidence for piracy and slavery in Ireland? 2010. C. Horrell & M. Damour (eds.), ACUA Underwater Archaeology Proceedings 2010; The Rutland Island Wreck, 2011. Archaeology Ireland, 25 (3); Jilts, Cracks, Night-Walkers and Others of the Linnen-Lifting Tribe, 2010. In U. Cosgrave (ed.), A Grand Gallimaufry: Essays in Honour of Nick Maxwell, Wordwell Publishing Ltd.; The Gaelic O’Driscoll Lords of Baltimore, Co. Cork: Settlement, Economy and Conflict in a Maritime Cultural Landscape, 2008. In L. Doran & J. Lyttleton (eds.), Lordship in Medieval Ireland: Image and Reality, Four Courts Press; The Quantification of the Underwater Archaeological Resource in Ireland as a Means to its Management and Protection, 2007. In P. Palma & J. Satchell, (eds.), Managing the Marine Cultural Heritage: Defining, Accessing and Managing the Resource, Proceedings of the Maritime Affairs Group/Mary Rose Trust Conference on Managing the Underwater Heritage, 2004, Council for British Archaeology Research Report 153; The Fort of the Ships, 2007. In C. Manning (ed), From Ringforts to Fortified Houses: Studies of Irish Monuments in Honour of David Sweetman, Wordwell Publishing Ltd.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?

Given my working background as a government manager, specifically in the management and protection of the underwater cultural heritage, I feel that I have a broad knowledge in and working experience of the current issues, discoveries and needs of the UCH and the important role that the ACUA plays in promoting and supporting the protection of our underwater heritage worldwide. This experience is complemented by my acting as representative for Ireland at events such as the UNESCO working group on underwater archaeology in London in 2008 and as an academic lecturer in underwater archaeology in the National University of Ireland, University College Cork. My job as a state archaeologist deals directly with management and protection issues within a legislative framework, but has a growing emphasis on outreach needs (liaising with divers, clubs, etc.) and the dissemination of information (educational workshops and presentations in schools and universities) to reach all those who are involved in underwater activities presently or in the future. This has afforded me the necessary qualifications to contribute positively to the mission and goals of the ACUA. Having served one term on the board of the ACUA, during which time I have worked along side and learned from fellow colleagues in the field of underwater archaeology from around the world, I feel I have, to date, made a constructive contribution to the ACUA and the SHA over the past 4 years of my term. This has involved being an active contributor to the SHA conferences, including participating in the ACUA Submerged Cultural Resource Workshop, but also on the board of ACUA where I have represented Ireland and Northern Europe. If re-elected, I would continue to expand on work done, to bring further knowledge and experience in issues relating to UCH from the region of the North Atlantic and would look forward to continuing to work towards ACUA’s objectives of advising on issues relating to the management, conservation, preservation and ethical treatment of our underwater cultural heritage.

If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

When I first took up the post as board member in the ACUA in 2010 I did so at a time when underwater archaeology in Ireland was still in its formative years. Since then it has become firmly established at both government and academic level. My first term on the board has afforded me the opportunity to gain first hand experience of critical issues affecting the UCH around the world, with the realisation that Ireland had the same issues at home and was not geographically isolated on the periphery of Europe. Further, it meant that being part of the ACUA afforded me extra support on and insight into such issues, which in turn, as a government manager, has positively influenced decisions taken as part of my own work. If re-elected, I would continue to strive to promote good practice and ethical approaches to the management and protection of underwater archaeology – an acute concern for all nations today who are trying to manage their finite submerged resource on ever-decreasing budgetary and personnel restrictions, and which is a central goal of the ACUA. The continued need to disseminate information through educational and outreach programmes would be one of my key priorities. To not alone educate on the need to manage and protect but to influence new blood to come on board and look to taking up the mantle for the future, to encourage membership but also enduring involvement in the preservation of our underwater heritage, by all members of society.  This is with a view to the long-term preservation of underwater archaeology but which would also ensure that the ACUA will continue into the future, supported by the experience of current members but augmented by fresh minds, fresh ideas and continuing committed membership.


sorna-webSorna Khakzad

Education
Ph.D. student Coastal Resources Management, East Carolina University, USA, Since Aug. 2011
Ph.D. researcher Cultural Heritage Management, University of Leuven, Belgium, Since Sept. 2008
Advanced Masters in Conservation of Monuments and Historic Sites, University of Leuven Belgium, Sept. 06- June 08
Masters in Architecture, Azad University of Tehran, Iran. Sept. 1996- July 2004

Present Position
Professional intern, UNESCO Headquarter, Paris, France, Promoting UNESCO Convention for protection of submerged World War heritage, From July 2013(For six months)
Teaching assistant at Maritime Studies, East Carolina University, USA, Since August 2012
Researcher and think-tank member, SPLASHCOST project (Submerged Prehistoric Landscape and Archaeology of Continental Shelf), Representing Belgium and cooperating in policy making for Europe coastal and submerged cultural heritage, Since March 2010
Researcher, Flemish Heritage Institute, Brussels, Belgium, Research on underwater and coastal cultural heritage policy making, Since January 2013

Recent Publications
“The lost city of Siraf and the missing pieces of Iran maritime history”, Paper presentation at Maritime Networks and Urbanism Conference, Roskilde, Denmark, April 2012. With Koen Van Balen, “Complications and Effectiveness of In Situ Preservation Methods forUnderwater Cultural Heritage Sites,” Journal of Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites, Vol. 14 Nos. 1–4, 69–78, 2012. “Coastal Breeze”, Editor, Official ECU Coastal Resources Management Program Newsletter, An annual publication, Since Jan. 2012. “The necessity of a common language for Evaluation and management of Underwater Cultural Heritage”, Poster presentation at IKUWA4 conference, Zadar, Croatia, 27 Sept.-2 Oct. 2011. “Underwater Cultural Heritage Documentation: History, Complications, Outcomes and Future”, Poster presentation at SMARTDOC Conference, Penn University, USA, 19-20 Nov. 2010. “The lost city of Siraf and the missing pieces of Iran maritime history” Sept. 2012, “Report on organizing the International Colloquium on the factors Impacting Underwater Cultural Heritage” July 2012, “Mission of Underwater Archaeology at INA-Bodrum, Turkey and Mission of Underwater Archaeology at HWTMA-Southampton, England” July 2010, “Conservation and Presentation of Underwater Cultural Heritage to the Public” July 2011 and “Report on activities and experiences of de-mining of cultural properties of Bamiyan and a conservation project” Sep. 2010, Raymond Lemaire International Center for Conservation Newsletter. “Underwater Cultural Heritage and Maritime Archaeology in Belgium-Part I, 2 Oct. 2009, and Part II, 15 Feb. 2010, “A brief introduction to Underwater Cultural Heritage in Europe”, 3 Mar. 2009, On-line publications at Museum of Underwater Archaeology,. “An Interdisciplinary Approach towards Underwater Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management”, The 1st WTA-International PhD Symposium on Building materials and Building Technology to Preserve the Built Heritage Proceeding, Belgium, Vol. 1, pp. 43-61, 9 Oct. 2009. “Conservation of Cultural Landscape through Heritage Assessment”, Architecture Plus Magazine, Issue 11- Surviving another Earthquake, 10 Mar. 2006

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?

Following my considerable amount of experiences, internationally in the field of cultural heritage in general and underwater cultural heritage specifically, I have broad understanding of factors impacting heritage and archaeology worldwide. Considering the fact that underwater cultural heritage is quite a young field in compare with terrestrial heritage, my knowledge of cultural heritage management and conservation has been an invaluable asset in projects which deal with underwater cultural heritage management.  This quality is of importance also for SHA and ACUA for more effective collaboration in achieving their common goals. Underwater cultural heritage is a branch of cultural heritage in general and all the values that we consider for terrestrial heritage are significant for underwater cultural heritage as well. Furthermore, the peculiar location of underwater cultural heritage makes this field of an additional significant. During last seven years of my academic and professional experience in the field of underwater cultural heritage, I have applied and adopted methods for studying and managing underwater cultural heritage with regards to internationally recognized standards for cultural heritage. I have had and have close collaboration with UNESCO in project management and promoting the Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage. Being a member of a European project, SPLASHCOST, made me familiar with the issues that Europe are facing at the moment specifically for the management of submerged historic and prehistoric landscapes. Working at Institute of Nautical Archaeology (Turkey) and White and Hampshire Trust for Maritime Archaeology (England) and Flemish Heritage Agency (Belgium) offered me deep insight to national issues in different countries.  These experiences provide me with a deep understanding of the issues which are considered crucial for studying, conservation and management of UCH. However, what I still would like to emphasis is that the legacy of human interaction with the sea and land, which is now we know as cultural heritage—either underwater or terrestrial– needs more attention. As a part of the expert community in underwater cultural heritage, I endeavor to determine and benefit from the potential of underwater cultural heritage as a resource for people’s advantages, education, and research, develop effective cooperation among stakeholders, and protection for future generation.

If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I am determined to follow the ethics of SHA and ACUA, and try to achieve their goals through sharing my international experiences which help bridge multiple disciplines and issues related to underwater and terrestrial cultural heritage. What I, in addition to many scholars, see as priority is education. I set my priority for education in different levels; public education in order to make public aware of the importance of underwater cultural heritage not only as a luxury, but emphasizing on the benefits that it can bring to them; children education which is considered one of the recent challenges and goals in many parts of the world and as a UNESCO mandate; education in higher level at universities and research centers and try to connect the scientific institutes which are developing new technologies for oceanic studies with educational institutes for maritime and underwater archaeology. It is crucial for all groups to know about the values of this heritage, however in different levels, and to allow and empower them to express their views on the current and future situation of their cultural heritage.

In addition to education, I believe that better policies for management of underwater cultural heritage can be effective in protection and conservation of this heritage. One of my aims is to follow good examples, such as UNESCO Convention on Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage and similar charters and regulations such as ICOMOS Charter, Council of Europe and to joint them with other sea and oceanic related initiatives on protection of marine resources, such as Marine Protected Areas and Coastal Zone Management Acts. This will help to enhance the state of cultural heritage as resource and attract more attention to its management and protection and integrate it into resources management plans. This fact also involves the economic values and benefits that underwater cultural heritage can bring for the societies and communities through tourism promotion and education.

I also believe that young generation, such as students of maritime studies and other related fields, can have more effective roles in the future of underwater cultural heritage protection, if they get involved more. I would like to give more chances to their voices be heard though activities such as workshops, presentations, blogs, websites and gatherings and cooperation in different initiatives.

One other priority is to give chances to the countries and state parties that had less chance to develop and initiate underwater archaeological studies. Although, the focus of SHA and ACUA has been more on the western world, now is the time to bring more examples of the whole world in our SHA and ACUA meetings and conferences. Many countries in Asia and Africa have been under-representative due to the lack of knowledge and/or techniques and so on.

Underwater cultural heritage is a common heritage of humanity, connecting people through the open waters to each other, and can be a factor to bring more people and cultures together.

In brief, through my focus on coastal cultural heritage and my multidisciplinary approaches in management of underwater and coastal cultural heritage, I am aiming at awareness rising, public education, capacity building for research, and protection and management of our underwater cultural heritage resources and discovering ways to benefit from underwater heritage in every possible way for the present and future generations. And I believe being an ACUA Board Member will give me opportunity to achieve many of my goals, which are also SHA’s and ACUA’s goals as well.


SecciM_Photo_20062013Massimiliano Secci

Education
PhD Candidate, Scuola di Dottorato in Storia, Letterature e Culture del Mediterraneo, Università degli Studi di Sassari.
M.A., Master in Maritime Archaeology, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Astralia, Australia.
B.A., Ancient Literature (Honours in Archaeology), Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.

Present Position
Research Fellow at Dipartimento di Storia, Scienze dell’Uomo e della Formazione – Università degli Studi di Sassari

Research Interests
Cultural Resource Management & Underwater Cultural Heritage Management; Public and Community Archaeology; Archaeological Theory; Underwater Cultural Heritage Education and Awareness Raising; Digital Archaeology; Underwater Remote Sensing

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?
Although being at an early stage of my career in maritime archaeology, I have clear in mind what my goals in the disciplinary field are. In the first instance, I trust necessary a major connection of our discipline with the “real world”. A deeper connection and collaboration is needed in many areas of our work and with many different stakeholders that, at present, are not often represented or taken into account in the disciplinary research agenda, particularly in regards to the management of underwater archaeological and overall cultural heritage. Again, connection and collaboration are important both within the field of study and with this one and the community as a whole. I have been attempting, in the last couple of years, to contribute in building a communicative bridge between Italian and Mediterranean scholars and colleagues from other parts of the world. I have been trying to nurture my connection in both directions, escaping the risk to lock oneself into a limited perspective and approach and instead opening to various perspective in the attempt to connect and combine the two parts in order to make capital of major achievements in the field. I am particularly focused on the socio-cultural aspects of our discipline, and this is clearly evident in my biography and in my publication record. I believe that a contemporary archaeologist cannot avoid having an understanding of the socio-cultural dynamics which are often triggered and influenced through our work. Such approach to our craft is cutting-edge in many countries and partially enforced in too many others. In my limited experience, I have been trying to push for a more active and involved archaeology, launching from the region where I work and trying to expand such attempt to mainland Italy and overseas. I believe that, considering the various ACUA missions, my commitment would be of interest in the council’s public outreach activities and, following the accreditation of ACUA as NGO supporting the Scientific and Technical Advisory Body to the State Parties of the 2001 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (2001 UNESCO Convention), acting as a representative for the Mediterranean area. In fact, working at the University of Sassari (Sardinia, Italy), I have had the chance to tighten contacts and collaborations with Mediterranean scholars which will be of interest in terms of ACUA’s contribution to the Scientific and Technical Advisory Body. I believe the geographical position of my working environment and the University International collaborations will grant a powerful connection between ACUA/SHA members and Southern European and Mediterranean colleagues, providing a channel for sharing of knowledge and experiences which is, in my opinion, of outer importance if maritime archaeologists and maritime archaeology wishes to become an Internationally homogeneous discipline, at least in terms of core concepts and general approaches proposed by the Rules annexed to the 2001 UNESCO Convention.
Regarding my own country of origin and working place I believe that, in accordance with Article II of the ACUA Bylaws, my commitment – already existing – to the Rules of the 2001 UNESCO Convention could be implemented and fostered pushing for a widespread and continuative application of such Rules in the Italian panorama, through peer pressure (Scott-Ireton 2005, 2008) and mediating influences (McCarthy and Garratt 1998) in order to create the climate for a nation-wide effective implementation of the 2001 UNESCO Convention mandates. My commitment in this direction has already been established since I got back to Italy from my study experience in Australia. Ever since I have attempted both in the disciplinary and public arena to pass the message that a more programmatic approach is needed in order to be able to effectively change the awkward situation sometimes existent in the overall Italian underwater cultural heritage management framework.

If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I believe that at this moment of ACUA’s life, the greatest importance should be given to few point that strongly interconnect:
1) Create a proactive and effective sharing between scholars from the diverse areas of the world involved with underwater and maritime archaeology and the management of the underwater cultural heritage; possibly organizing moments for such sharing to actively occur as, for example, by exchanging host participations to fieldwork or academic activities (i.e. visiting professorships etc.). An effort that would prospectively have a positive effect in reciprocally understand issues and approaches taken by colleagues and act as a thrust for a more powerful and aware proposition of instances to competent authorities as the Scientific and Technical Advisory Body at UNESCO.
2) Foster, both at an International and National level – particularly in the countries where less developed – exchange moments between the discipline and the public (i.e. local community etc.). Foster public outreach and awareness rising as a basis to improve underwater cultural heritage protection and stewardship.
3) Contribute to the development and fostering of archaeological best practices regarding the underwater cultural heritage in countries where variables inherent to the management framework hinder a fluid advancement of ethical and professional standards.
4) The developments internal to the Università degli Studi di Sassari involvement in the field of maritime archaeology and underwater cultural heritage management will surely help in rising awareness on the value of a protected underwater cultural heritage. The University is in fact working on the membership to the UNESCO/UNITWIN Underwater Archaeology Network Program which will surely help tighten connection with worldwide university working on the academic training of future maritime archaeologist.
Therefore the commitment I have put in creating link in several aspects explicitly addressed by the 2001 UNESCO Convention will, I believe, be of interest for the active evolvement of ACUA activities in the same aspect and fields of interest.
To conclude, I am outright projected to support both, ACUA efforts to contribute to the evolution of the disciplinary field of maritime archaeology and to apply contacts and knowledge acquired through my service at ACUA, through a two-way relation which, I again believe, would be positive for both sides.


spirekJames D. Spirek

Education
B.A. History, George Mason University
M.A. Nautical Archaeology and Maritime History,East Carolina University.

Present Position
State Underwater Archaeologist, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina Columbia

Past Positions
Deputy State Underwater Archaeologist, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina Columbia
Underwater Archaeologist, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina Columbia
Field Director, Pensacola Shipwreck Survey and Emanuel Point Shipwreck Project, Florida Bureau of Archaeological Resources

Past Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA Presenter at annual conferences,
Session Co-organizer, Quebec City
South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology Diving and Safety Control Board member.

Research Interests
Civil War naval operations, 16th-century seafaring, and Remote-sensing operations.

Recent Publications
Exploring the United States’ Naval Legacy in South Carolina, In South Carolina Archaeology, ed. A. King, Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, chapter co-author with C. Amer (In Press) ; The Archeology of Civil War Naval Operations at Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, 1861-1865, reported submitted to the National Park Service, American Battlefield Protection Program by Maritime Research Division, South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (2012); Submerged Cultural Resource Management:  Preserving and Interpreting Our Sunken Maritime Heritage.  The Plenum Series in Underwater Archaeology, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, ed. with D. Scott-Ireton (2003)

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?

My experience with public-sector underwater archaeology relating to research, legislative, regulatory, and public outreach, corresponds with the mission of the ACUA to promote and preserve the underwater archaeological heritage throughout the world.  My current position as state underwater archaeologist offers a unique platform to promote and advocate for the preservation of the underwater archaeological legacy in South Carolina through outreach to Federal, State, and Local policymakers, archaeologists, sport divers, and the public.  I have also been fortunate to have worked overseas on various projects outside of the United States that have broadened my awareness of the challenges facing fellow underwater archaeologists and the need to provide outreach and support when requested on standards of the discipline, methods, and general advice.  Using this experience gained over many years in the field, I look forward to the opportunity under the aegis of the ACUA to address and provide guidance to issues on a national and international level that we confront on the state level to preserve the underwater archaeological heritage for future generations and archaeologists.

If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

If elected to the ACUA, I would stress the role of the ACUA/SHA to promote the discipline of underwater/historical archaeology to a variety of audiences, especially messaging the need for preservation and ethical standards to realize the potential of these valuable sources of knowledge as avenues to understanding our past, present, and future.   One means to accomplish this is to provide links to underwater archaeological research projects and activities of SHA members and organizations on the ACUA website that espouse the missions of the ACUA and SHA.  By offering these case studies exemplifying the practice of underwater archaeology, we can spread the message of what sound and ethical archaeology is in contrast to monetized-incentive recovery efforts put forth by various media and organizations. An undertaking that would require limited financial wherewithal from either entity’s budget and would complement ongoing ACUA/SHA activities to educate policy makers, governments, sports divers, and the general public about the importance of preserving these unique archaeological resources.  I look forward to working in concert with the other ACUA board members on this endeavor and serving to promote and advance the mission of the ACUA/SHA.


wvduivenvoorde_photoWendy van Duivenvoorde

Education
Propedeuse Art History and Archaeology, University of Amsterdam, 1993
M.A. Mediterranean Archaeology, University of Amsterdam
Ph.D. Anthropology, Texas A&M University

Current Positions
Lecturer in Maritime Archaeology at Flinders University
Adjunct Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Western Australia
Affiliated Scholar at the Institute of Nautical Archaeology.

Past Positions
Assistant Curator, Department of Maritime Archaeology, Western Australian Museum (2006–2012); Research/Teaching Assistant, Nautical Archaeology Program, Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University

Professional Service
Acting President Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology (2013–present); Deputy Director, Australian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres (2012–present); Australian Committee Member for the Agreement between the Netherlands and Australia Concerning Old Dutch Shipwrecks (ANCODS)(2012–present); Vice-President, Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology (2011–2013); Steering Committee Member, International congress for underwater archaeology/Internationaler Kongreß für Unterwasserarchäologie (IKUWA)(2011–present); Council Member, Advisory Committee of Underwater Archaeology (2010–2013); Committee Member, South Australia Maritime Heritage Working Group, advisory body to SA Heritage Council (2012–present); Editorial Committee Member, Special Publications of the Australian National Centre of Excellence for Maritime Archaeology (2011–present); Editorial Review Board, Bulletin of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology (2011–present); Organising Committee Member, 2016 International congress for underwater archaeology/Internationaler Kongreß für Unterwasserarchäologie (IKUWA 6), Perth (2011–present); Organising Committee Member, Indian Ocean World Centre 2012 Conference, Perth (2011–2012); Organising Committee Member, 2013 Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference, Perth (2011–2013); Scholarship Committee Member, Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology (2011–present); Scientific Committee Member, 2013 Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference, Perth (2011–2013).

Research Interests
Nautical archaeology; archaeometallurgy; dendroarchaeology; technological advancement; Mediterranean and European shipbuilding, seafaring, and seamanship.

Recent Publications
With Ben Ford, 2013 (in press), Perspectives from Historical Archaeology: Maritime Archaeology, The Society of Historical Archaeology; with Jim Stedman, Kjell Billström, Zofia A. Stos-Gale, and Michael McCarthy, 2013, The Zuiddorp Lead Ingots: A Report on their Provenance and Manufacture. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 42(1):1–17 (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1095-9270.2012.00362.x/abstract); 2012, Chapter 34: Use of Pine Sheathing on Dutch East India Company Ships. In Between Continents: Proceedings of the twelfth International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology, Istanbul 2009, ISBSA 12, Nergis Günsenin, editor, pp. 241–251. Ege Yayınları. Istanbul. ISBN: 978-605-4701-02-5; 2012, The Anchor of the 3rd-Century-BC Ship from Kyrenia, Cyprus: A One-Armed Wooden Anchor with a Lead-Filled Stock. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 41(2):397–407 (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1095-9270.2012.00350.x/abstract); 2012, VOC schip Zuytdorp spoorloos verdwenen op zee, Scheepshistorie 14:92–101 (http://www.lanasta.com/Shop/product/133/scheepshistorie-14.html); 2012, Message on the Rocks. Engage: Bulletin of the Graduate Programs in Archaeology, Cultural Heritage Management, and Maritime Archaeology (June):8–9 (http://www.flinders.edu.au/ehl/fms/archaeology_files/dig_library/graduate%20program/ENGAGE-Jun2012.pdf); 2011, 2009 WA Museum ALA Fellowship Placement: An Archaeological Survey and Corrosion Study in Geographe Bay, Report No. 250, Department of Maritime Archaeology, Western Australian Museum, Fremantle; 2009, More Than Just Bits of Hull: Expensive Oak, Laminate Construction, and Goat Hair: New Insights on Batavia’s Archaeological Hull Remains. Tijdschrift voor Zeegeschiedenis 28(2):59–68 and 72–73.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?

Over the last two decades, I have worked as an archaeologist (maritime, historic, classical, and prehistoric), museum curator, cultural heritage manager, and educator in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia. These wide-ranging experiences enable me to contribute effectively to the interdisciplinary and international nature of ACUA/SHA. Having conducted fieldwork and scholarly research, administered heritage sites, and developed regulatory policies, I bring a balanced view of the issues and challenges facing ACUA/SHA and archaeologists and heritage managers the world over; one grounded in practical experience and understanding.

If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

If re-elected, I will continue working to make ACUA more recognized and relevant throughout the world. Over the last years, ACUA’s efforts to support best-practice archaeology and create greater awareness within communities and government agencies have been impressive, but there is much still to be done. As a committee member, I will embolden ACUA’s voice advocating the importance of protecting underwater cultural heritage in the spirit of the UNESCO Convention. To support ACUA’s struggles against the destruction of maritime archaeological heritage by commercial salvage, government corruption, and uninformed elements of the public, I will emphasize a cooperative model between government, industry, academia, and the private sector to find innovative, practical, and sustainable solutions that, at the same time, benefit local communities and the general public.